When I dream of water, I never dream of rain. That
insistent monsoon music has no place in
the soul of this siren – no,
only a sea blanketed by clouds,
or the fog of a morning seeping like secrets between
evergreens and swirling amid the twirling arms
of wind turbines – or the impatience of rivers, hustling
like businessmen or soldiers, confined within the
Earth’s fences, soil slowly yielding to the force of another nature,
another mother, whose sharp tongue froths and whips,
bearing new fruit from old loins – or,
cakes of ice, glassy and heavy and melting loudly,
bobbing like birds among the warmer waters of choppy seas.
Yes, it always returns to the seas.

Rain – that moody, weeping thing, gleaming like a veil
over a sky too full for words – or turning night streets to mirrors,
reflecting in its selfless way the lights of a species
hunched against its gifts, chilled through from wet—
I’ve never seen you quite right,
and I’ve never dreamt of rain falling into oceans,
only in the backyards of my memories, but
I suppose even the ocean must drink somehow,
and even rain must be welcome somewhere.

©K Paige Medina 28 November 2017



Were we destined to become our mothers?
Can we fight the chill of night?
Can we sing the songs of summertime,
Can we set the world alight?
Are we merely younger burdens
Meant to rock our worlds undone,
Are we sleepless and eternal,
Were we really born to run?
Does the lightning ever scare you
As it burns bright and is gone,
Or do you take quiet comfort
In the way it’s like the sun?

We’ve never had the answers,
But we aren’t afraid of night.
We’ll stand in darkness knowing
If we’re patient, we’ll see light.